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Incendiary Traces: Weaponized Landscape Depictions,Tracings, and Call for Participation

[Click on Images to Enlarge]

Baghdad

Landscapes—the spaces we live in—are framed pictorially. Landscape images produce compelling myths and wield political power. In international relations they can highlight or fabricate virtues and erase the appearance of violence. In this way, are landscape images a kind of psy-ops—a weapon? Can picturing landscapes also be a political intervention?

Baghdad

Traditional landscape paintings depict few, or no, people. In 1991, CNN broadcast blurry green night scope footage of the U.S. bombing of Baghdad that married the aesthetics of traditional landscape painting with the theater of contemporary remote war. The glowing lights of anti-aircraft fire in the night sky dominate the frame. Below, the city is dark, its inhabitants imperceptible. Landscape aesthetics are a kind of psychological weapon here, applied to blur and soften violence.

Los Angeles

In the months leading up to the 2003 U.S. “Shock and Awe” bombing of Baghdad, I scrutinized CNN’s 1991 landscapes in anticipation of seeing a new version with the impending attack. Looking at the dark city, I noticed for the first time palm trees and low-lying stucco buildings that looked unsettlingly like my neighborhood in Los Angeles. It seemed that this landscape is that landscape. This home is that home. This could be here.

Los Angeles

So, could our otherwise celebrated palm tree-dotted landscape be reverse engineered to bring home connections between Los Angeles and countries with whom we have political conflict? This project seeks to use the act of (re)picturing as a tool for connecting to remote sites of conflict—to bring the there here.

Los Angeles

The images shown here respond to this question. Starting from the 1991 footage of Baghdad, I used two pictorial strategies to make connections. First, with my own camera I tried to reproduce the scene shown in the CNN footage. I drove around my Los Angeles neighborhood seeking shots of low-lying stucco buildings, palm trees, and bushy built horizons in the same composition as the video stills.  Though close, my photos of Baghdad in L.A. are less than perfect. So I traced CNN’s images of Baghdad and my L.A. images. Tracing, my hand covers the territory of both places, bringing them home through this intimate process. These tracings are shown here.

Los Angeles

These images are the seeds of an archive of images I am developing for investigating and discussing the reverse engineering possibilities of the palm tree-dotted landscape. Can we use these landscapes to connect to remote sites of conflict? I am currently seeking contributions to the archive and discussion. If you are professionally engaged in investigating these questions I would like to hear from you.

More information can be found here, and you can follow the project on Facebook here.

Los Angeles